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Plant Focus

Quercus skinneri
Quercus skinneri is a Central American oak, distinguished by the large size of its fruit.

Living in the Magic of Trees

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Thomas Allocca

Published May 2018 in International Oaks No. 29: 45–50

Abstract

What is a treehouse?
Not surprisingly, in this age of extreme ecological concern and ever-increasing interest in the natural world from many quarters, a number of architects have, over the past two decades, reflected on the arboreal world to develop an innovative answer to that question. Arboreal architecture is thus not just about “building in trees” but rather, as this paper shows, a philosophy that has inspired the use of architectural knowledge to enhance the beauty of trees and to develop a novel way of interacting with them. Beyond simply providing an extravagant solution to private homes, arboreal architecture has a role to play in developing positive interactions with trees and forests.