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Editor's Picks

Karl Georg Theodor Kotschy was an Austrian botanist and...
Eike Jablonski | Jun 11, 2016
Quercus grisea - Greenlee County, AZ
This article is an account of the oak field trip organized...
Charles Snyers | Sep 22, 2017
North American oaks have a northern temperate origin and...
Website Editor | Oct 12, 2017

Plant Focus

Quercus acutissima subsp. kingii
Quercus acutissima Carruth. is a species whose natural distribution covers a vast territory in East and Southeast Asia, from central Nepal...

Nursery News

This year I have received an unprecedented demand for oaks. This is exhilarating and exciting. One client bought 15 Quercus lobata. Another took about 50 oaks to Ireland. Another from Italy enquired for 120 different oaks in twos and threes. An enquiry for 60 oaks has just come in. It is very encouraging that oaks are becoming so important and that they are wanted in small quantities and large.

A Monument to Monumental Oaks

Rainer Lippert has always been interested in old trees. At the age of 16 he started to visit the largest trees in his home district in Germany, drawn in particular to the majestic grandeur of ancient oaks. He recorded their dimensions, categorizing the giants according to the girth of their trunks. As he grew older, his range of action became wider, expanding from rural district to administrative region, then his entire native Bundesland (as German states are called), and ultimately all of Germany.

The Himalayan Oak Trust

It sounds like something out of science fiction, but David Cranwell has managed to create a reality where an acorn planted in New Zealand grows into 50 oaks in the Indian Himalayas.

Stretching the Rules

An oak which breaks the rules... Do oaks have rules? Well, I think so: the rule of survival of the fittest implies that all unnecessary branch structure is unaffordably costly in resources – the aim of a tree should be to display the maximum leaf area for photosynthesis attached to the minimum possible structure. And the culprit in question? Quercus saltillensis.

The Barva Oak

Since 2012 I have traveled to Costa Rica four times, searching for acorns of some Quercus species that were not represented in the collection at Iturraran Botanical Garden. 

OACN 2017 Year in Review

The Oaks of the Americas Conservation Network (OACN) is an interdisciplinary consortium of oak experts from universities, botanic gardens, arboreta, conservation NGOs, and industry and government agencies aiming to address the research and conservation needs for oaks in the Western Hemisphere. In the short time since its founding in 2016, OACN has been able to make important progress on a number of projects and initiatives focused on oaks in the Americas. Here is a review of some of the work OACN has completed in 2017:

Barking up the Right Trees

A young and vigorously growing Quercus ‘Maya’ that we planted in 2007 showed a minor crack at the base of the trunk after the winter of 2011-2012...

Cultivar Close-up: Thread and Lace

As Co-Registrar of oak cultivars I think it’s important to periodically remind members about some of the exceptional selections of oaks that are out there in collections and nurseries. In the interest of appealing to a broader group, I thought I would select a cultivar from the Old World and one from the New.

The Botanical Garden of Porto is located on the west side of the city of Porto, on a plateau overlooking the mouth of the Douro River and the Atlantic Ocean. Currently covering 4 hectares, it is part of the grounds of the University of Porto campus and is situated on what was once Quinta do Campo Alegre, a historic estate formerly on the outskirts of Porto. 

Species Spotlight: Quercus semecarpifolia Sm.

Quercus semecarpifolia, commonly known as brown oak, is the main forest-forming evergreen tree species from upper temperate to subalpine regions (2,500–3,300 m) in Western Himalaya.

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