Log in

Editor's Picks

287086_146665648749006_6570936_o.jpg
A massive Quercus robur stands outside the village of...
Roderick Cameron | Aug 16, 2020
cover_scientific_american.jpg
An article published in Scientific American recounts how...
Website Editor | Aug 13, 2020
Quercus alba at Melbourne Botanic Gardens
One of the largest oaks at Melbourne’s Royal Botanic...
Tim Entwisle | Aug 09, 2020

Plant Focus

quercus_x_haynaldiana_bokrijk.jpg
Six oak cultivars originally described by Jef Van Meulder in 2014.

El Jardín del Rosario, Spain, October 25-28, 2017

PDF icon Full text available for IOS members only. If you are a member, you need to log in.
To create an account click here; if you have already registered, click here to become a member.

Béatrice Chassé

Published May 2020 in International Oaks No. 31: 89–100

Introduction

In October 2017 I had the opportunity to visit the Jardín del Rosario (Villanueva del Rosario, Málaga, Spain) created by José P. Alba, long-standing member of the International Oak Society. Today, nearly 40 years after José and his wife, María José, acquired the property in the area known as the Valle Alto del Guadalhorce, the garden that has come to life there is the result of their interest in plants that has developed over the years, combined with his professional experience as civil engineer.

At the time of acquisition, in the early 1980s, the couple had no intention of creating a garden, or, a fortiori, an oak collection. Initially, the idea was to have a secondary residence, not far from Málaga, where they and their children could spend time with nature. The story of this garden is a story of transformation, both of the land that it occupies and of its creator. As José says, being fond of plants and gardens was the only relationship he had with these things up until about 20 years ago. Since then, both he and his garden have grown tremendously.