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Editor's Picks

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Stelian Radu, a founding member of the IOS, accomplished an...
Website Editor | Jun 16, 2019
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Scientists in Poland have successfully micropropagated 500...
Website Editor | May 30, 2019
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Five-minute, fifteen-slide Lighting Talks were included for...
Website Editor | May 01, 2019

Plant Focus

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Quercus look is one of the least-known oaks of the arid mountains of the Middle East. It grows on Mount Hermon and in the Anti-Lebanon...

Shaun Haddock's blog

The Oak Societies

It may surprise you to learn that we are not the first Oak Society! Another Oak Society used to meet at the Crown and Anchor pub on the Strand in London.

Acorn Time Approaches

Abundant rain in southwest France in the early part of this year has fostered a bumper seed crop at Arboretum de la Bergerette, some (such as Quercus emoryi) already ripe: thus my thoughts turn once again to the seed exchange forum I mooted, which is at present under construction – many thanks to those of you who have already contacted me on the subject, confirming that the idea is worth pursuing.

Pollen Poachers

Bees are thieves! It’s official! After my recent note pointing out that bees were seemingly harvesting pollen from a Quercus suber without any commensurate benefit to the tree, serendipitously the latest issue of the magazine The Plantsman contained an article giving a synopsis of research into "bee plants" by the National Botanic Garden of Wales, prompted by the alarming dip in global bee numbers.

Stretching the Rules

An oak which breaks the rules... Do oaks have rules? Well, I think so: the rule of survival of the fittest implies that all unnecessary branch structure is unaffordably costly in resources – the aim of a tree should be to display the maximum leaf area for photosynthesis attached to the minimum possible structure. And the culprit in question? Quercus saltillensis.

A Forum for Garden-Sourced Oak Seed?

It was a mast year in 2017 here in southwest France, spreading acorns so thickly under some trees they formed a solid carpet. So Quercus pubescens is evidently not in danger for now, but what of less plentiful species elsewhere? 

Trees and Shrubs Online Project

Many readers will have seen the reference on the IOS website to the publication online of the 8th edition of W.J. Bean’s Trees and Shrubs Hardy in the British Isles under the auspices of the International Dendrology Society (IDS), and many, particularly those who are members of the IDS, will be aware of the publication, with the cooperation of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, of New Trees, which, in effect, brought “Bean” up to date by covering trees introduced to cultivation after Bean’s publication in the 1970s.

The Oaks of Dunkeld

Across the River Tay from Dunkeld, within easy walking distance, are two oaks with connections to the arts.

The Elusive Baloot

Quercus baloot is a drought-tolerant oak found in the drier valleys not only in Afghanistan, but also in the north of what is now Pakistan and into Kashmir; by and large it evaded introduction to Europe until, more by luck than by judgement, I was able to do so in reasonable number in 1995.

Windstorm at Arboretum de la Bergerette

Six years after Hurricane Klaus, disaster strikes again.

A Very Voluminous Vat

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